Last edited by Faerg
Thursday, May 14, 2020 | History

4 edition of The New York conspiracy, or, a history of the Negro plot found in the catalog.

The New York conspiracy, or, a history of the Negro plot

Daniel Horsmanden

The New York conspiracy, or, a history of the Negro plot

with the Journal of the proceedings against the conspirators at New York in the years 1741-2.

by Daniel Horsmanden

  • 87 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published by Negro Universities Press in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • New York (N.Y.) -- History -- Conspiracy of 1741

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesLibrary of American civilization -- LAC 15643.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination392 p.
    Number of Pages392
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13558922M
    LC Control Number87550450
    OCLC/WorldCa18967197

    The New-York Conspiracy, or a History of the Negro Plot, with the Journal of the Proceedings against the Conspirators at New-York in the Years (New York: Southwick and Peluse, In , New York City was thrown into an uproar when a sixteen-year-old white woman, an indentured servant named Mary Burton, testified that she was privy to a monstrous conspiracy against the white people of Manhattan. Promised her freedom by authorities if she would only uncover the plot, Mary reported that the black men of the city were planning to burn New York City to the ground. As the.

      One Man Exposed the Secrets of the Freemasons. His Disappearance Led to Their Downfall Before his book could be published, William Morgan was dragged away by a group of Masons, never to be seen again. Click to read more about The Great Negro Plot: A Tale of Conspiracy and Murder in Eighteenth-Century New York by Mat Johnson. LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for booklovers All about The Great Negro Plot: A Tale of Conspiracy and Murder in /5(1).

      New York Weekly Journal, A full and particular Account of the Negro Plot in Antigua, as reported by the Committee appointed by the Government there to enquire into the same, March 7, Public Record Office, The Confessions of Wan an Indian Slave belonging to Peter Low and of York a Negroe belonging to Peter Marschalk, J , and J The New York Conspiracy, or a History of the Negro Plot: With the Journal of the Proceedings Against the Conspirators at New-York in the Years ; Together with Several Interesting Tables avg rating — 0 ratings/5(3).


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The New York conspiracy, or, a history of the Negro plot by Daniel Horsmanden Download PDF EPUB FB2

New York slave rebellion ofalso called New York Conspiracy of or the Great Negro Plot ofa supposed large-scale scheme plotted by black slaves and poor white settlers to burn down and take over New York ly fueled by paranoia, the city’s white population became convinced that a major rebellion was being planned.

: New-York Conspiracy, or a History of the Negro Plot with the Journal of the Proceedings Against the Conspirators at New-York in the Years Second American Edition, illustrated with tables at rear. Modern quarter calf over paper-covered boards; all edges untrimmed; scattered light foxing and spotting to text, some dampstaining at bottom edge of title-page and prelims Price: $ The New-York conspiracy, or, A history of the Negro plot, with the journal of the proceedings against the conspirators at New-York in the years New-York: Printed and published by Southwick & Pelsue,no.

3, New-street, Mat Johnson delves into an embryonic era of Colonial American history with his latest offering, The Great Negro Plot: A Tale of Conspiracy and Murder in Eighteenth-Century New York. The non-fictional title implies a stoic tome, but surprisingly the author infuses a fresh voice and contemporary observations into the telling of fateful events Cited by: 3.

The New York Conspiracy: Or a History of the Negro Plot, with the Journal of the Proceedings Against the Conspirators at New-York in the Years Together with Several Interesting Tables Author: Daniel Horsmanden. When a series of thirteen fires broke out in March and April ofEnglish colonists suspected a Negro plot--perhaps one involving poor whites.

Much as in Salem a half century before, hysteria came to colonial America, and soon New York City's jails were filled to overflowing. Daniel Horsmanden. Citation Information: Daniel Horsmanden, The New-York Conspiracy, or a history of the Negro plot (Excerpt).

New York: Southwick & Pelsue, The parties accused of the conspiracy were numerous, and business by degrees multiplied so fast upon the grand jury, which bore the burthen of this inquiry, that there would have been an immediate necessity for others to have lent a.

This tension boiled over in the spring when a series of fires led white New Yorkers to fear a slave uprising. Even Fort George in lower Manhattan was burned to the ground. The events became popularly known as the New York Conspiracy of (also called the Negro Plot or the Slave Insurrection).

Get this from a library. The New-York conspiracy, or A history of the Negro plot: with the journal of the proceedings against the conspirators at New-York in the years. [Daniel esq Horsmanden].

New York Burning is a well-told tale of a once-notorious episode that took place in Manhattan in Though, as Jill Lepore writes, New York's "slave past has long been buried," for most of the 18th century one in five inhabitants of Manhattan were enslaved, making it second only to Charleston, South Carolina, "in a wretched calculus of urban unfreedom."/5(37).

Source: Daniel Horsmanden, The New-York Conspiracy, or a History of the Negro Plot, with the Journal of the Proceedings Against the Conspirators at New-York in the Years –2.

New York: Southwick and Pelsue,53– The New York Conspiracy, Or A History of the Negro Plot, with the Journal of the Proceedings Against the Conspirators at New York in the Years Together with Several Interesting Tables, Containing the Names of the White and Black Persons Arrested on Account of the Conspiracy, the Times of Their Trials, Their Sentences, Their Executions.

The "Negro Plot Trials": An Account by Douglas O. Linder () New York City (seen from the south in ) InEnglish colonists in New York City felt anxious. They worried about Spanish and French plans to gain control of North America.

The New-York conspiracy; or, A history of the Negro plot, with the Journal of the proceedings against the conspirators at New-York in the years by Horsmanden, Daniel, Pages: The Negro Population of New York City.

The Negro population of New York City has had a history similar to that of other Northern cities. Beginning with a small body of slaves, it has since had its problems growing out of the presence of an increasing number of Negroes in. The New York Slave Revolt of was an uprising in New York City, in the British Province of New York, of 23 enslaved killed nine whites and injured another six before they were stopped.

More than three times that number of blacks, 70, were arrested and jailed. Of these, 27 were put on trial, and 21 convicted and executed. Full text of "The New York conspiracy: or A history of the Negro plot, with the journal of the proceedings against the conspirators at New-York in the years.

InNew York City was thrown into an uproar when a sixteen-year-old white woman, an indentured servant named Mary Burton, testified that she was privy to a monstrous conspiracy against the white people of Manhattan. Promised her freedom by authorities if she would only uncover the plot, Mary reported that the black men of the city were planning to burn New York City to the ground.

Author Mat Johnson recounts the events of in his new book "The Great Negro Plot." He joins us now from the studios of WHUD and WSPK in Beacon, New York. Mat, nice to have you. March Brian M. Dunn nonfiction The Great Negro Plot: A Tale of Conspiracy and Murder in 18th-Century New York by Mat Johnson.

In which a group of Negro Slaves, cunning of mind and armed with both evil intent and a complete lack of gratitude, didst plot to Rise up against their Caucasian benefactors and commit acts of atrocious violence against decent God-fearing men, women and children. —Edwin G. Burrows, coauthor of Gotham: A History of New York City to “With sensitivity to deadly conspiracy heightened by 9/11, Hoffer deftly wraps the events of in a context packed with the tension of producing swift and sensible justice in a society bedeviled by racial and religious bigotry and by unreliable rules of evidence.Jill Lepore's "New York Burning: Liberty, Slavery, and Conspiracy in Eighteenth-Century Manhattan" is a valuable and admirable examination of one of the darkest episodes in New York's history: the so-called slave rebellion of and the brutal vengeance that was extracted.[47] In Judge Daniel Hoardsman’s The New-York conspiracy, or, A history of the Negro plot, with the journal of the proceedings against the conspirators at New-York in the yearshe includes charts with the names of alleged participants, their “owners/masters,” and whether they were burned or hanged for their alleged participation.

[48].